“You Shall Love Your Neighbor As Yourself” (Leviticus 19:18)

The Jewish Funeral

A rich tradition that reflects the fundamentals of the faith.

Olive Branch

Kronish Funeral Services

Kronish Funeral Services is locally owned and controlled organization with deep roots in the community. We are going to do whats best for you and your family.

 

We understand the needs of your faith, as we live them ourselves.

Jewish tradition teaches that human beings are created in the image of God (Genesis 1:26). This is the underpinning of all of the rituals and customs that make up a Jewish funeral. This concept extends both to the deceased and the mourners. While each community has their own customs in regard to funeral practices, nonetheless, certain key concepts are universally practiced by all streams of Judaism.

Adopted from ReformJudiasim.org

  • Chai

    Location of the service

    Jewish funerals can take place in a variety of locations. Some funerals are exclusively graveside; others occur in multiple locations-starting at the synagogue, or a funeral home, and then processing to the cemetery.

  • Chai

    Timing of the service ​

    Traditionally, burial takes place as soon as possible-within 24 hours. This is not always possible and, given the fact that many modern Jewish families are spread out around the country, it usually becomes necessary to wait a day or two until all of the mourners can arrive. Jewish funerals cannot take place on Shabbat or on most Jewish holidays.
  • Chai

    Mourners/Avelim

    Traditionally, Jewish mourners have specific responsibilities and prohibitions. Tradition teaches that the following people are "officially" designated as mourners: Parent, child, spouse, or sibling. This does not mean that others do not grieve the loss of the deceased, but Avelim have specific roles to perform - both in the funeral service and the days preceding, and during the months following.

  • Chai

    Accompanying the dead for burial

    Jewish tradition teaches that one of the most important mitzvot (commandment) we can perform is helping our loved ones find their final resting place. This is both a symbolic and actual act. Our presence at a funeral is symbolic.

  • Chai

    Comforting the mourners/nichum avelim ​

    One of the most important mitzvot that we can perform is the act of nichum avelim - comforting mourners. We do this in a variety of ways. When we attend a funeral and are not avelim ourselves, our very presence provides comfort. For mourners, knowing that you care enough to support them at their time of need is a powerful statement that goes far beyond the actual moments you are in attendance at the service.

  • Chai

    Casket

    Jewish tradition teaches that the deceased should be buried in a simple casket. It should be completely biodegradable and made entirely of wood - with no nails whatsoever. Embalming is also not permitted (unless required by law). The reason for this is so that the process of decomposition can take place in a natural fashion. Open caskets are not permitted at Jewish funerals. In most cases, the closed casket is present at the service. Jewish law is also subject to local laws. As such, rules about embalming, grave liners, and other regulations that are in place for public health must be followed.

  • Chai

    The order of the service in the chapel/sanctuary

    While there are rituals that must be performed at a Jewish funeral, customs and traditions vary greatly depending on the community and the person who officiates at the service. Usually, a member of the clergy (rabbi or cantor) officiates, but this is not a religious requirement.

    • Gathering of the mourners - Traditionally, mourners do not greet attendees until after burial. Prior to the service, family members and loved ones of the deceased will gather together in a separate room and wait until the service is about to begin.
    • Keriah (tearing) - Just before the beginning of the service, the officiant will gather the mourners together and place a black ribbon on their outer garment. (In some Orthodox communities, an actual garment is torn.) This is usually done when the family members are gathered prior to the service.
    • Procession of the mourners - Once all of the attendees are seated, the mourners are ushered into the service and seated in the front rows of the chapel.
    • Opening prayers - The service usually begins with the reading or chanting of Biblical passages , usually from the book of Psalms. This is followed by silent prayer and then a hespeid (eulogy) is delivered.
    • Hespeid (eulogy) - The purpose of the hespeid is to both honor the deceased and comfort the mourners (nichum aveylim). Usually the officiant delivers the eulogy after meeting with family members and loved ones. During this meeting, the officiant will ask loved ones to share stories and history about the deceased.
    • El Malei Rachamim - This is a prayer that is usually chanted that mentions the deceased by their Hebrew name and states that they are "sheltered beneath the wings of God's presence." The congregation stands during the chanting of this prayer.
    • Recession of family members - In most cases, after the El Malei Rachamim is recited, the family exits the chapel and retires to the separate family room in preparation for the funeral procession.
    • Removal of casket - After the family leaves, those individuals who have been honored as pall bearers will process from the chapel to the funeral carriage. The rest of the congregation waits until the casket has been escorted from the room.
    • Procession to Cemetery or Mausoleum - A funeral procession from the chapel is formed by those in attendance who will be going to the internment. Again, it is considered to be an important mitzvah to accompany a person to their final resting place.
  • Chai

    The order of the service - internment

    The internment service is very brief. Again, traditions vary by community, congregation, and officiant. The following reflects the basic customs:

    • Procession of the casket from to the place of internment - Once all of the mourners and attendees have gathered at the graveside or crypt, the pall bearers take the coffin out of the hearse and walk to the place of internment. In some communities, the procession stops seven times. There are many reasons for this custom. One basic reason is to acknowledge that this is a very difficult task and that we are in no hurry to conclude.
    • Lowering of the casket (if in ground burial) - This may vary from community to community. In some cases, the casket is lowered immediately while prayers are recited. In others, the lowering comes after the recital of prayers. Usually, the cemetery provides a lowering device which gently places the casket at the bottom of the grave.
    • Prayers at graveside or crypt - There are a short series of prayers dealing with mortality and love.
    • Mourners Kaddish - The mourners Kaddish is a doxology - a prayer extolling God. It does not specifically mention death. The Kaddish is recited by the mourners for the first time at the place of internment. Traditionally, it is recited every day for 11 months following burial and then on the yahrzeit (yearly anniversary) of the deceased.
    • Placing earth in the grave - Since the mitzvah of "accompanying the dead for burial" is so important, the act of placing earth into the grave takes on a very important role in the service. In some communities, the entire casket is covered with earth. In other communities, earth is symbolically placed in the grave.
  • Chai

    Nichum Avelim (comforting the mourners) at the end of the service

    After the service is concluded, the mourners are comforted by the attendees.  Participants then proceed to the house of mourning to participate in the shiva.

Providing Funeral Services to the Jewish Community of South Florida

Kronish Funeral Services proudly serves the Jewish community of Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, and Martin Counties, including the cities of Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton, Delray Beach, West Palm Beach, Palm City, Stuart, and the surrounding areas.

Our staff is available 24 x 7 to help you with all your funeral needs.

CONTACT

KRONISH FUNERAL SERVICES

9070 KIMBERLY BOULEVARD, SUITE #22
BOCA RATON, FL 33434

561-717-2874   |   info@kronishfuneral.com

KRONISH FUNERAL SERVICES IS A REGISTERED TRADE NAME FOR KRONISH, SUNSHINE & CO., INC., A LICENSED FLORIDA FUNERAL ESTABLISHMENT

PRIVACY NOTICE | © 2019 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 What to Expect At A Jewish Funeral

Jewish tradition teaches that human beings are created in the image of God (Genesis 1:26). This is the underpinning of all of the rituals and customs that make up a Jewish funeral. This concept extends both to the deceased and the mourners. While each community has their own customs in regard to funeral practices, nonetheless, certain key concepts are universally practiced by all streams of Judaism.

The following is adapted from ReformJudiasim.org

  • Chai

    Location of the service

    Jewish funerals can take place in a variety of locations. Some funerals are exclusively graveside; others occur in multiple locations-starting at the synagogue, or a funeral home, and then processing to the cemetery.

  • Chai

    Timing of the service

    Traditionally, burial takes place as soon as possible-within 24 hours. This is not always possible and, given the fact that many modern Jewish families are spread out around the country, it usually becomes necessary to wait a day or two until all of the mourners can arrive. Jewish funerals cannot take place on Shabbat or on most Jewish holidays.

  • Chai

    Mourners/Avelim

    Traditionally, Jewish mourners have specific responsibilities and prohibitions. Tradition teaches that the following people are "officially" designated as mourners: Parent, child, spouse, or sibling. This does not mean that others do not grieve the loss of the deceased, but Avelim have specific roles to perform - both in the funeral service and the days preceding, and during the months following.ery.

  • Chai

    Accompanying the dead for burial

    Jewish tradition teaches that one of the most important mitzvot (commandment) we can perform is helping our loved ones find their final resting place. This is both a symbolic and actual act. Our presence at a funeral is symbolic.

  • Chai

    Comforting the mourners/nichum avelim

    One of the most important mitzvot that we can perform is the act of nichum avelim - comforting mourners. We do this in a variety of ways. When we attend a funeral and are not avelim ourselves, our very presence provides comfort. For mourners, knowing that you care enough to support them at their time of need is a powerful statement that goes far beyond the actual moments you are in attendance at the service.
  • Chai

    Casket

    Jewish tradition teaches that the deceased should be buried in a simple casket. It should be completely biodegradable and made entirely of wood - with no nails whatsoever. Embalming is also not permitted (unless required by law). The reason for this is so that the process of decomposition can take place in a natural fashion. Open caskets are not permitted at Jewish funerals. In most cases, the closed casket is present at the service. Jewish law is also subject to local laws. As such, rules about embalming, grave liners, and other regulations that are in place for public health must be followed.
  • Chai

    The order of the service in the chapel/sanctuary

    While there are rituals that must be performed at a Jewish funeral, customs and traditions vary greatly depending on the community and the person who officiates at the service. Usually, a member of the clergy (rabbi or cantor) officiates, but this is not a religious requirement.

    • Gathering of the mourners - Traditionally, mourners do not greet attendees until after burial. Prior to the service, family members and loved ones of the deceased will gather together in a separate room and wait until the service is about to begin.
    • Keriah (tearing) - Just before the beginning of the service, the officiant will gather the mourners together and place a black ribbon on their outer garment. (In some Orthodox communities, an actual garment is torn.) This is usually done when the family members are gathered prior to the service.
    • Procession of the mourners - Once all of the attendees are seated, the mourners are ushered into the service and seated in the front rows of the chapel.
    • Opening prayers - The service usually begins with the reading or chanting of Biblical passages , usually from the book of Psalms. This is followed by silent prayer and then a hespeid (eulogy) is delivered.
    • Hespeid (eulogy) - The purpose of the hespeid is to both honor the deceased and comfort the mourners (nichum aveylim). Usually the officiant delivers the eulogy after meeting with family members and loved ones. During this meeting, the officiant will ask loved ones to share stories and history about the deceased.
    • El Malei Rachamim - This is a prayer that is usually chanted that mentions the deceased by their Hebrew name and states that they are "sheltered beneath the wings of God's presence." The congregation stands during the chanting of this prayer.
    • Recession of family members - In most cases, after the El Malei Rachamim is recited, the family exits the chapel and retires to the separate family room in preparation for the funeral procession.
    • Removal of casket - After the family leaves, those individuals who have been honored as pall bearers will process from the chapel to the funeral carriage. The rest of the congregation waits until the casket has been escorted from the room.
    • Procession to Cemetery or Mausoleum - A funeral procession from the chapel is formed by those in attendance who will be going to the internment. Again, it is considered to be an important mitzvah to accompany a person to their final resting place.
  • Chai

    The order of the service - internment

    The internment service is very brief. Again, traditions vary by community, congregation, and officiant. The following reflects the basic customs:

    • Procession of the casket from to the place of internment - Once all of the mourners and attendees have gathered at the graveside or crypt, the pall bearers take the coffin out of the hearse and walk to the place of internment. In some communities, the procession stops seven times. There are many reasons for this custom. One basic reason is to acknowledge that this is a very difficult task and that we are in no hurry to conclude.
    • Lowering of the casket (if in ground burial) - This may vary from community to community. In some cases, the casket is lowered immediately while prayers are recited. In others, the lowering comes after the recital of prayers. Usually, the cemetery provides a lowering device which gently places the casket at the bottom of the grave.
    • Prayers at graveside or crypt - There are a short series of prayers dealing with mortality and love.
    • Mourners Kaddish - The mourners Kaddish is a doxology - a prayer extolling God. It does not specifically mention death. The Kaddish is recited by the mourners for the first time at the place of internment. Traditionally, it is recited every day for 11 months following burial and then on the yahrzeit (yearly anniversary) of the deceased.
    • Placing earth in the grave - Since the mitzvah of "accompanying the dead for burial" is so important, the act of placing earth into the grave takes on a very important role in the service. In some communities, the entire casket is covered with earth. In other communities, earth is symbolically placed in the grave.
  • Chai

    Nichum Avelim (comforting the mourners) at the end of the service

    After the service is concluded, the mourners are comforted by the attendees.  Participants then proceed to the house of mourning to participate in the shiva.